Corn Wars and Harvest galore

This Monday morning, I decided to take a garden tour while the coffee was brewing. It was not a pretty sight that I saw. I knew we had something in the corn last week, but the rains came, we were busy moving Paulina, and I didn’t think about it. Today I saw some worse damage. Either Saturday or Sunday night, they/it/whatever hit again. I went out and picked what I could today, but only managed about eight or so cobs. I think we have reached the end of this year’s corn harvest. At least a dozen or so cobs are on the ground ruined along with several of the stalks. I couldn’t find any tracks of any kind, and really don’t know what caused this chaos. So much for any more fresh corn. Here is the picture version of our corn wars.

Corn War 1

Corn War 1

Corn War 2

Corn War 2

Corn War 3

Corn War 3

Later in the day, I went outside to see if there was anything in the garden worth picking. Of course there is, but you just feel so defeated after seeing a mess like the knocked over corn, and all those cobs. Of all things, they were stripped off the stalk and peeled open and eaten nearly clean. I just don’t get it. We have never seen such a thing before. Perhaps I am naïve. I also found the cabbage so worm infested there is no saving that either. Last year it seemed bad, but I was able to save at least 12 heads. This year, they have been eaten in half. Gross. Perhaps next year it is time to give the garden a complete rest. Plant a cover crop of — oh let’s say, grass. We can pull the posts and roll the fencing and go on vacation. I know it will take a whole lot less water.

Anyway, I went to the beans to see if there was any thing in that tangled mess. I came away with a five quart pail of beans and a back ache. I only made it through about 40 percent of what is planted. Hopefully I can get the rest tomorrow. The peppers are my high light this year. I picked what you see in the wagon above, and that was only the very largest ones on the plants. Some plants have about six or seven peppers on while others are just finishing the flowering stage. We should have peppers for as long as it is warm enough. As for the temperature here; it feels around 50 or 60 today. It is really cold. The sky is dark blue and it looks like we are about to have snow. Yes, I said the “s” word. It sure feels more like the end of October than the end of August.

Harvest from today.

Harvest from today.

I also picked an entire three gallon pail of tomatoes and about 20 cucumbers. They are really odd in size. I think there was a spell when they needed rain or water or both and none was given. I am guessing as long as it is warm enough they will come through with another batch soon. The dill is nearly finished for the year, but I am seeing new growth of that. Oh yikes, I promised myself that I would be outside to pick the basil and sage today. The basil is starting to seed out, so I need to bring it in and start dehydrating. When harvest starts the work never ends.

And I thought that tomorrow would be a day for writing my message for the nursing home on Wednesday. Thursday is my only other day at home as we will be going to Bismarck on Friday. Paulina has an appointment with a specialist about her hearing and tonsils and such. The appointment is late afternoon and football game in Mobridge at 7 p.m. We will be cruising. I will have to check with the grown daughters to see if we are really having company for Labor Day. Hopefully!!

Oh last share before I leave you with the zinnias. The other harvest that has been overly plentiful around here is dead rodents. I suspect that Roger has begun helping Sophia in that department. The upper deck is currently littered with bodies, and today when I went to the back door to hoist up the pails of produce, I nearly stepped on a water soaked something. After looking at it from inside the house through the window, it appeared to be the fetus of some larger rodent. Yikes it was gross.. There, I just thought you might like to know that. Weird sense of humor. OK, go puke if you need to, I nearly did after looking at it.

At least the bees are still out working. Hope they enjoy the flowers as much as I do.

At least the bees are still out working. Hope they enjoy the flowers as much as I do.

7 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Mary J. Guess
    Sep 02, 2014 @ 17:55:36

    Seeing your corn photo reminds me of the corn patch we had two years ago. Harvest was just about to begin when we found a scene similar to yours. The culprits were identified visually the next day, caught in the act – RATS! It seems that every time we think we’ve gotten rid of the rats, even more show up; two days ago I saw six run out of their hole when my flashlight shone on it. Unfortunately, they stay in the garden area, where the dogs can’t get to them; but oh, if only the dogs could get to them! Our female Staffordshire bull terrier, a sweetheart, loves to catch and eat rats.
    Looks like you’ve got several quarts of dill pickles in your future, and the peppers and beans are beautiful! I’m envious of the beans and cukes, as ours performed poorly this year.
    And pray tell why you’re having to harvest tomatoes before they’re fully ripe? I’ve been doing it to save them from squirrels, but they don’t ripen as well as they do on the vine, so I’m curious whether you have a similar situation.
    The zinnias are gorgeous, by the way. I see the bees like them, but probably not for the same reason we do.

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    • lucindalines
      Sep 02, 2014 @ 18:02:28

      I am a worry wart and have always taken tomatoes as soon as they are orangish. I never trust the weather. One year we lost most to hail and I dread having to pick them all in a hurry because of frost which is right around the corner here. So interesting to hear that rats will eat corn like that. I always think raccoons tend to leave more behind. These are suspiciously eaten clean. There is an old-wives tale in our family that says rats move away when you get a white cat because they confuse it with a weasel. Good luck getting rid of them.

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  2. Sue
    Aug 29, 2014 @ 08:28:22

    Racoons. Racoons will rip corn to shreds and ruin a patch overnight. We had trouble every year with them until we bought those solar flashing red lights made to keep animals out of the garden.

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  3. deliciousdaydreams
    Aug 26, 2014 @ 08:22:14

    Loving your bounty! Those peppers are so pretty! And, of course, the zinnias. They’re my favorite flower. They stand up to our Florida heat, and growing them from saved seeds is a breeze. Question, though: do yours get mildew on the leaves?

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